New Device To Help Dads Breastfeed Baby

Mothers can now take a break and let the fathers help with their babies’ feedings all thanks to a Japanese tech company!

Dentsu debuted its Father’s Nursing Assistant, a wearable nursing assistant device designed to resemble a woman’s breast in hopes that a newborn would latch on to the device the same way it would latch on to their mother. . In Japan, men have the lowest participation rate in fatherhood which lead Dentsu in hopes to alleviate some of these problem. This invention will allow fathers to get involved with feeding and putting the baby to sleep.

 

 

This device has a container where breastmilk or formula milk can be filled on one side and a breastfeeding system on the other. Dads can hold their baby with both arms while wearing the nursing assistant over the dad’s chest allowing a more intimate skin-to-skin bonding time.

One of the features in Dentsu’s Father’s Nursing Assistant is a technology that tracks your baby’s sleeping and feeding pattern which the data can be view on an application.

 

 

This innovation was showcased at Southwest Festival in Austin, Texas but it’s not available for sale just yet. But this isn’t the first attempt in making dad’s life easier on breastfeeding, just last year a Marie-Claire Springham gained attention for her “chestfeeding” invention. This device offer a hormone that stimulates the production of the milk-producing glands, essentially making it possible for men to feed their baby with their own milk. Yay or Nay? The revolutionary invention won the Grand Trophy prize at the Meaning Centred Design Awards 2018.

 

 

Her invention was truly thoughtful as it was not about the act of breastfeeding but rather dads have expressed that they want to be involved with the baby. The kit contains a pump, a compression vest and it also contains hormones. Fathers who wants to be part of this journey can start as early as six weeks before the baby’s due date by taking domperidone, which would trigger hormones to start milk production.

“I designed this first as an empathy tool, I was looking at post-natal depression and I learned so much, particularly that it occurs in men and the main cause of that is the feeling of being left out.” she told Good Morning Britain.

Coincidently, both Dentsu and Springham’s invention will soon be expected to make an appearance in the next five years.

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